Friends Of The Little Bighorn Battlefield

The Next Generation In The Study Of Custer's Last Stand

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Guest Book 2007

Name: rocky hanrahan  mass
Date: 31 Dec 2007

Comments

there is an episode of the twilight zone titled the 7th is made up of phantoms. it is a thriller! It tells of a group of Nat'l guardsmen who go back into time and participate in the battle with general Custer. the other Nat'l guardsmen look for them and cannot find them. they look at the monument and find their names on the list!!!


Name: Mike Semenock
Date: 31 Dec 2007

Comments

Thanks to Ernie LaPointe for sharing with us so much over the last few years. We have learned of his great grandfather, Sitting Bull, those things that were passed down through the family and may never have been known to us otherwise. Ernie and Sonja represent the history of the great Lakota warrior and medicine man, as well as the growing recognition of Sitting Bull as a symbol of American greatness for this, and future generations.


Name: Theresa Hilley
Date: 28 Dec 2007

Comments

He will surely be missed. I really enjoyed his commentaries in the civil war films. God Bless you Brian.


Name: Michael Bachman
Date: 27 Dec 2007

Comments

Is the prevailing thought that Custer was trying to capture the women and children that were running away to the head of the village, and that the grey horse troop couldn't cross the LBH at the middle of the village due to the quicksand at the Medicine Tail Ford?


Name: Robert Luppi
Date: 25 Dec 2007

Comments

Great website portraying a fascinating riveting story in America's frontier history. Robert luppi, great-grandson of Corporal John L. Reynolds and great-great grand nephew of Musc. John Mclennon, of the the 7th Infantry, who showed up at Custer battle scene hours too late to join the fight.


Name: Maurice
Date: 24 Dec 2007

Comments

Dear Friends: just to thank you for your wonderful historic website on the famous battle. I have always had a great interest in the Old west after discovering the paintings of F. Remington & C. Russell.


Name: Emmet O.
Date: 20 Dec 2007

Comments

Wishing you a very happy christmas and new year,and keep up yere good work the web site is excellent.


Name: David Carter
Date: 27 Nov 2007

Comments

Brian was awesome!!! His knowledge of the war of Northern aggression was great and I still mourn his death. He was awesome. God help his family and keep up the fight.


Name: David Godbee
Date: 25 Nov 2007

Comments

I once met a French man in Giverny,France and I asked him where he would go in the U.S.if he could.Guess what he said."Little Big Horn."


Name: Dolores Umbridge
Date: 24 Nov 2007

Comments

Oh Doug, whoa is me your information helped me on my report to the Ministry this morning. By golly Douglas Keller you are SWELL !


Name: Don White
Date: 18 Nov 2007

Comments

Over 500 days infantry Vietnam.Several native Americans in the Platoons I commanded or was plt sgt of.Like my other men the Native Americans were BRAVE,LOYAL, and RESOLUTE.At LBH nobody had it coming just a clash of two cultures WE now need to be one.Custers only choice after having been seen was to advance and recon in force the only possible tactic.He was hit before he could reunite the regiment.The warriors would have got the best of it as they were super brave and had more repeating rifles(Archeological evidence) then Custer had W/O the Packtrain escort.White America never honered its viet vets like the folks on the Rez did when their warriors came home from vietnam-Don White formerely plt/sgt-1st sgt US INF


Name: shining way woman
Date: 17 Nov 2007

Comments

i have been to the battlefield several times, and each time come away with different feelings...it is indeed a place of great solemnity...i am glad to see it back in the hands of those it 'belongs' to...about the photo of tshunka witko...i knew when i saw it that it was he..i did not need a 'description'..just felt and knew it...i have waited most of my life to see the face of the man who was my childhood hero...shining way woman


Name: Marty
Date: 12 Nov 2007

Comments

I watched HBO's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. It was pretty good. August Schellenberg is always good. (Black Robe) I thought Shaun Johnston stole the show in his scene with Sitting Bull before the skirmish. Johnston convincingly played Miles.


Name: Mel Crist
Date: 18 Oct 2007

Comments

The picture of Crazy horse can't be him. The hair is to dark. His was light colored almost blonde. He was fare skinned too. As a youth he was teased for being almost white.


Name: Lyn Henry
Date: 11 Oct 2007

Comments

I had the honor of meeting Ernie LaPointe this past weekend in Cherokee, NC. He is such a pleasant,humble and kind man. His main goal is to let all people know the REAL history about his great grandfather, Sitting Bull.


Name: Paula Pitts
Date: 09 Oct 2007

Comments

This past weekend I had the pleasure and honor to meet Ernie LaPointe at the Cherokee Fall Fair on the rez here.... He was gracious and kind and thoughtful... What struck me was his desire for peace between the whites and first peoples, to lay to rest the hurt and pain and anger and find some sense of peace and purpose and healing for our children today. He was gracious enough to allow me and my daughter to have a picture made with him so that I would have something to remember this occasion by... He was generous with his time and funny and seemed to have that same sense of understanding that his GreatGrandfather must have had.... It was my pleasure and honor to meet Ernie, and I pray for his dream of a decent resting place at the battlefield for his ancestor to be realized... and if you have not heard him you should... he tell the real story of what started the battle of the Little Big Horn... Blessings of Creator to you Ernie....


Name: Flash
Date: 02 Oct 2007

Comments

Hi again everyone. There are some things about the battle, that I find confusing, even after years of study, and i also have a couple of questions maybe some of you can answer with regards to many of the wonderful photos on the site. 1. I recall reading in "Son Of The Morning Star", that Trumpeter Martini was not in fact the last cavalrymen to see Custer alive, and that there were two more soldiers (i believe that Curley or another scout came across) both of whose horses had given out, and the two men, while not ever engaged on the Custer battlefield, were in fact the last two. Does anyone recall this or can confirm if this is legitimate or has been verified? 2. Also, In "Son Of The Morning Star", there is a strange passage that described approximately 25 men of Captain Yates' F Company, being among Reno and Benteen's men who were later rescued from the defense site. the conjecture was that F Company was the last in line in the column and maybe some had fallen back. Has this claim been verified, in terms of those men later being with Reno and Benteen? How can such a large point not be widely discussed, in terms of why these men would not have continued onwards? 3. If I recall correctly, Tom Custer was in charge of C Troop...how was he on Last Stand Hill? was someone else in tactical command of C, while Tom stayed with the HQ command? 4. E Company, The Grey Horse Troop, were stationed approximately in the site of the National Cemetery, and E were the ones that made the breakout for Deep Ravine. According to the wayside guide, it is said it was these men that made the breakout from Last Stand Hill. So my question is this...F was stationed on Last Stand Hill, E was stationed in the National Cemetery...at some point, E made a move as a skirmish line to push the indians back...the indians were surprised, but then rallied...is this event confused with the last breakout? If not, what happens next? Is E then pushed back to their original location? Or do they join F on or very near Last Stand Hill? Why is Algernon Smith on Last Stand Hill and not with E towards Deep Ravine? Does Last Stand Hill fall and THEN E, which was nearby "jump up and break for the ravine" startling the indians? or are E and F completely together, and about the same time as Last Stand Hill is about to be overrun, E is ordered to make the skirmish line and push the indians in Deep Ravine Area back, and that becomes the so called Breakout, which occurs shortly before Last Stand Hill is overrun, thus E troopers seeing Last Stand Hill overrun, with Smith up there, just finally flee to the Ravine as the last possible safe haven? I find this action to be very confusing. 4B. We know that the indians stampeded the horses of C and L...what of the horse from I Company? Where were they in all this? Were they led to a ravine for safety too? Since I was in reserve, were they still mounted? Were their horses stampeded around the same time Company L's were? 4C. Where were the horses of E and F? I assume E's horses were in the area of The NAtional Cemetery, near their troopers...were those horse stampeded as well? We know F still had their horses, right to the end, since they shot them to make breastworks...so where were the grey horses? they must have been stampeded I assume, if not why, on earth, would E and F, still under the tactical command of most of the high ranking officers not mount up and try for a breakout. There was no other way to survive, because by then, C, L, and I were wiped out, and that was most likely seen and know very quickly by HQ command. I still believe in my own mind, that Custer and the command would not have remained where they were, if all still had their horses...my theory is, that since E had lost their Horses to stampeding etc.they were on foot, and had no way out...F still had their horses, and could have conceivably escaped east...many would have been killed, but a pistol charge of about 100 troops (both companies mounted) would definitely have made a breakthrough. Custer and F, still with horses, knew they could not leave the dismounted E troopers and whatever wounded there, so they were completely stuck...maybe that was why Smith remained with Custer...he still had his horse, or who knows...but what about this theory I have...If E didn't make the breakout till LAst Stand Hill had fallen, it would be clear that Custer, Command and F eseentially said that we are not leaving E behind, so kill the horses to make barricades and fight it out...OR...maybe they told the E Troopers essentially, get down to that ravine, which will give you better cover then here since you can't mount, and are exposed, or they were trying to move in unison, maybe seeing if E would be able to move in a skirmish line back south, covering the west flank and F could mount and possibly head south as well, while covering the east flank. When E was immediately overwhelmed on the way, and the remaining troopers not killed on the trail, broke for the ravine for cover, the last hopes of E were gone...with Custer, and F seeing that, they would have had a last chance to mount up and try to escape, but maybe they waited just that minute too long, and the Indians had closed in and got to close, so the gamble failed, they were completely surrounded and outnumbered, the possiblity of mounting quickly and taking off vanished, and the only way left was to kill the horses for breastworks, because why else would you kill your last remaining lifeline? That part still perplexes me...your one saving grace is an animal that can move at 25 MPH...they must have just waited too long...since none of the other companies shot their horses, I find this concept extremely plausible, or at least interesting to contemplate. 5. Also, are the markers on the "Deep Ravine Trail" (i seemed to have counted around 18 from the photos) E troopers who were on the skirmish line/breakout to Deep Ravine? The other 28 men from E Company were never found but were known to have died in Deep Ravine, is that right? In other words, as the Company brokeout, approximately 18 were killed on the way down, and the remainder reached the ravine and were killed there? 6. In "Son Of The Morning Star" one of the indians relate a story about how he and a couple of other indians chased a trooper "on a good horse" ( i assume he was from either C, L, or I and was able to breakout during the confusion and took off in the direction from which the troops had come, and just as the indians were about to give up chasing him because their ponies couldn't keep up, he looked back and then pulled out his pistol and shot himself. Did this story ever check out? was a body and horse found that might suggest that was true? 7. In the many wonderful pictures, I find myself confused...I was counting up as much as possible from what I could see in terms of the grave markers...Inside the fence on Last Stand Hill, I counted 52 Markers. On the Deep Ravine Trail, there appear to be about 18 Markers, also, according to the text, there are 28 troopers from E somewhere in Deep Ravine. In the pictures of the Keogh sector on the Eastern slopes of Battle Ridge, I counted 57 markers, from the main group all the way towards the backside of Last Stand Hill. That is 155 troopers that I have counted so far. My confusion comes in the area of C Company and Calhoun Hill. I see photos containing only a very few markers in both areas. Are there simply not enough pictures taken of those areas? If there are I would love to see them. I ask because Last Stand Hill and Deep Ravine Trail and Deep Ravine appear to contain a roughly correct number that you'd expect from 2 companies. (98 men) the Keogh sector has about 57 men. Where are the other 55 markers? I see only about 12 or so in the pictures of Calhoun Hill...and I see only 5 or 6 in the area where C Company was destroyed. Are there no more photos of these areas? Have I missed something that I should have seen? Just how depleted were the companies of their full strength manpower? I know 8 troopers from each company were transferred to the Pack Train force, so each of these companies would have what, approximately 38-40 troopers +2 officers each? If there were about 52 bodies inside the fence and 46 towards Deep Ravine, that would mean that maybe or so 20 troops from the other sectors made it Last Stand Hill? If there were 57 bodies in the Keogh sector, about 15 of those would have spilled over from the remnants of Calhoun Hill, correct? So where are the 55 other markers for C and L? Does anyone have pictures if these two areas that show more markers? Sorry to be such a pest, but the topic is so interesting, and perhaps what makes it so compelling is that there alwasys seem to be new things to be learned. Any help and answers would be greatly appreciated thanks for listening :)


Name: John J. Kudlik Ph.D.
Date: 29 Sep 2007

Comments

Sorry to hear that your 2007 files were lost in a computer error. I think one that I had written might be among the lost. It more or less read as follows: When I was a young teenager in the 1950s, my mother had an elderly lady friend who lived in Monessen, PA. We would visit her once in awhile, and I was usually bored to death in that stuffy old apartment last decorated in the 1920s. During one of those visits, I was reading a book about Custer and looking at a repro litho of "Custer's Last Fight" I had brought with me. In her thin, high pitched voice, Mrs. Burke asked me "What are you reading." I told her and she replied "Custer, my grandfather knew him." Now that interested me! She went in an old roll top desk and came out with an album of tintypes and CDV images, and sure enough, there was GAC himself. Her grandfather was Martin Coulson, Captain of the steamboat Josephine, which along with the Far West assisted the Army in 1876 with troop movements and supply deliveries on the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers. When she passed away some years later I received the album along with a number of other steamboat related items. Among them was a small writing desk and chair which she said came from one of her grandfather's boats. I used to sit on that chair doing my homework, wondering if Custer had ever used it??!! Keep up the good work with your website.


Name: E (Yates) T.
Date: 19 Sep 2007

Comments

To C. Custer I agree with you about Gen Custer and be proud of him. He was childhood friends with my GGG Grandfather Captain George W Yates. They fought in several battles in Civil War. Were both wounded in Fredericksburg. Then years later went to Montana together. I treasure the bits and pieces of things I have. I just finished reading the book, "A Summer on the Plains with Custer's 7th Cavalry" it was the love story of my GGG Grandparents. Also his wife Annie stayed closed friends with Gen Custer's wife and lived near each other till they both died. They live to into their 90's.

9/19/07: Thank you for these thoughts about Yates and Brian Pohanka. I have a copy of the Annie Yates diaries that Brian Pohanka edited. Brian signed the book for me at the end of the Deep Ravine Trail on June 25, 2004. Sadly, it would be the last book Brian inscribed to me. Brian also presented a heart-filled paper about George and Annie Yates at a symposium I chaired in the late 1990s. It was the best presentation Id ever seen Brian give.  Regards, B.R.


Name: E (Yates) T.
Date: 19 Sep 2007

Comments

In response to JK Wilson. Please read your history. The Army was there at least 2 years before this battle. This is where my yes GGG Grandparents Capt George W Yates met his Annie Gibson Roberts. If the support troops had arrived on time and NOT a day late they would had won that battle. Brian Pohanka when he was there in June of 2004 and I Quote said in fact Custer had no other choices but to make the calls he made when he did. Custer also was expecting his back up troops to be there and they were not. My GGG Grandfather died next to him. So don't presume to tell us who had what coming to them. I have the book Brian Pohanka edited of Annie's diaries and the letters that Capt GWY sent to her. Libby Custer was there too with her husband. When it got dangerous they sent the women out of there. Communication was not what is was then what it is now. So don't presume. Proudly to be the GGG Granddaughter of Colonel George W Yates. He was promoted Colonel when Annie had him buried where she wanted him to be!


Name: kent young
Date: 17 Sep 2007

Comments

When I was a kid in the 50's and 60's i used to go help my grandpa on his ranch on Powder River in Montana.There was an interesting bed on the flat by the river.I have reason to believe it could have been Custer's bed,he said he camped there on june 9th 1876. If someone is interested in this story, i have photos i can e-mail. yours truly Kent Young


Name: Wiliam Brady
Date: 15 Sep 2007

Comments

I have been fascinated by the Little Bighorn since I was a child and finally got to visit a few years ago... that was not enough and I read daily from different fav books and want to plan a return with more time to indulge so many facets... turns out there was a Pvt in Company F who was KIA with my same name... I will join the Assoc veeeery soon! Hoka Hey! Garryowen, and deep respect!


Name: SWright
Date: 11 Sep 2007

Comments

Hi Flash & Keith, thank you kindly for your helpful information. My dad will certainly enjoy this surprise trip which he has dreamnt about for many years.


Name: Keith Patton
Date: 11 Sep 2007

Comments

As I was saying I visited in 1984 and as early as the late 1960's. Where once the fields were marked by mere karns, now there are self guiding walking tours. A great improvement. I was gratified to see Mr. Scott's seminal work included in an updated presentation of the battle by the NPS. Fairly progressive for a goverment agency!


Name: Keith Patton
Date: 11 Sep 2007

Comments

I have been to the battlefield numerous times, most recently in 2002 with my kids. We did the Bozeman Trail visiting all the indian battlefield sites along the way. The NPS had done a great job in improving not only the Little Big Horn Battlefield but also the WagonBox and Fetterman Fight sites and Ft. Phil Kearny. Back in 1984 when I visited all the locations post wild fire, the


Name: Flash
Date: 11 Sep 2007

Comments

Hello Swright...my best guess (as a new yorker and someone who has a friend who visited the battlefield) would be to fly in to Los Angeles, CA if that is convenient for you from Australia...from there, you should be able to easily find a flight to Bozeman, MOntana or Billings, Montana (Billings is closer to the Battlefield) if you rent a car in Billings, I believe it is a quick 40 mile drive east on Interstate Highway 90, to Hardin, Montana. My friend stayed at a "Super 8 Motel" located there with reasonable rates (90 US dollars per night) though I am sure cheaper accomodations could be found. from there, the Battlefield is approximately 15 Miles further southeast/approximately 15 minute drive. I believe there is guided tour information on the Custer Battlefield/National Park website, and my friend did a a very interesting tour sponsored by the Crow Indian Reservation, where you ride horses for anywhere between 1-3 hours through the entire battlefield with very well informed guides who provide information as well. here is the super 8 motel page and there is a link to the battlefield on it as well http://www.roadsideamerica.com/attract/MTCRObighorn.html http://www.roadsideamerica.com/hotels_motels/hotelinfo/89728.html Directions: I-90 exit 510, Hwy. 212 east, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument is on right.


Name: Swright
Date: 10 Sep 2007

Comments

Hi All Can any one tell me how I would get to the LBH Battlefield today to view the battlefield etc from Australia. Which port should I fly into and where would I have to stay. Is there tours etc. Any help appreciated.


Name: kellyd
Date: 07 Sep 2007

Comments

My family and visited the Battlefield and State Park in spring of 2004. We were extremely impressed with how it is kept and how kind the staff all are. I am a relative of one of the officers and being giving some of the information for the first time turned into an extremely emotional experience for me. Thank you for this web site and Thank State Park Staff at Little Big Horn. Without all of you there to help all of us none of this would be possible! I am eternally grateful.


Name: Kellyd
Date: 04 Sep 2007

Comments

I think Custer was an excellant soldier. I have read a great deal about him going back to Civil War where he was injured in Fredicksburg. What I think happened here in LBH was a lot of confusion and mistakes were made all around. This was a war. Communications then were not what they are now. Mistakes are made now, and we still have what they call "friendly fire" I think its all very sad, but I don't believe it can all be put down on one man. Not even an officer. If he wasn't a good officer and soldier President Lincoln would not had trusted him to go out for this mission. President Lincoln was known to do a great deal of thinking things out before making his decisions. He made decisions calmly. Yes it turned out horribly for everybody. But thats battle on a battlefield. I have a nephew in Iraq. From what he says they are not showing us on TV news what is really going on over there. Its another Viet Nam. Its War.


Name: Josh
Date: 30 Aug 2007

Comments

what a fantastic site you have created.I applaud you for your excellent work. The battle of the little bighorn first caught my eye at age 10, and 25 years letter my interest is still there. Imagine all we have learned over the years to enrich our knowledge of what actually happened that day. So many important things have been learned about the battle and i only wish there was more to be known. I am sure we will learn alot more in the coming years, but there are some things we will never truly know, which perhaps is the mystery that keeps us all so intrigued. I have two questions, which i hope you can help me with. i have heard two relatively new theories bandied about (at least new to me, but probably not to scholars and experts) First, is that there were at least two bugle calls from Custer HIll, which coincided with Custer and his troops spotting the guidon of Capt Weir when he reached Weir Point, and that there was still time to at least attempt a rescue but Reno was against it. Secondly, what i have never been able to figure, is that Custer had a reputation for recklessness or what might better be characterized as "military improvisation" if you will, or making bold daring moves...why didn't he use them when it became apparent that the situation was so dire? Obviously, around the time that C Company collapsed, that signalled the beginning of the break down of the orderly skirmish lines etc. at that stage, and taking fire from all sides, realizing his position was very tenuous, why didn't Custer immediately recall F company, take E & F companies and proceed immediately back east, to reach Keogh, where I company was not yet in trouble, who had not come under assault from Crazy Horse yet, and immediately join Calhoun and hightail it out of there. Custer as the master of the brazen cavalry charge his whole life, played it so safe, with dismounted skirmish lines. ultimately, it would have taken no time to remount, take F,E,I,L and the remainder of C whose mounts had been stampeded, and retreat at full speed back east to the rest of the command. would the indians not have been completely surprised by this move? it would have immediately changed the dynamic in that Custer could have ordered the troops to holster their carbines, and use their revolvers exclusively while in a mounted charge/retreat to the east. many of the indians were not mounted and were attacking on foot, 200 plus cavalry men in a full out charge with 6 shots each at their disposal before having to reload a 1 shot carbine would certainly have been a formidable and surprising move. after all, E company's last minute charge to deep ravine drove the indians back and took them by surprise (albeit briefly) and there were far fewer troops making that move and they were not mounted either. Is it just me or does not a hell bent charge /retreat east to break through on horse sound like a better idea then to stay on foot, and watch your lifeline, (your horses) be stampeded away from you and with it any chance of escape? i believe this was in fact Custer's fatal mistake. His original strategy may have been sound, but he didn't have a "doomsday" plan so to speak...which is so strange considering his legendary flair for reckless, bold, improvisational maneuvers. why do you think this is? Was someone urging him to be conservative? was he paralyzed?(i don't think so)everything was okay temporarily before the collapse of C company but when the collapse of C company happened, that started the domino effect...but that effect at the very least had to take 5-10 minutes before things started falling apart...that is more than enough time to remount E and F (via bugle i suppose), and move towards Keogh who clearly, seeing this would understand that Custer had every intention of getting the hell out of there and remount his troops and Calhoun would see this as well and do what was necessary...it would have taken less then a minute or two for this to happen due to how close the northern companies were, and Keogh was not much further south, and Keogh and Calhoun could have linked up rather easily. 200 troopers with revolvers drawn could be moving at full speed along battle ridge, putting up a wall of lead on all sides to get out of there. I guess we will never know, but am i the only one who has thought of this? It certainly would not have been expected, and let's face it, the whole point of cavalry is to provide a lightning fast and devastating charging spearhead, yet when dismounted, suddenly you have decreased your firepower by what 20-25% (with one trooper holding what, 3-4 other horses?) anyone have any thoughts on this? thanks for listening. :)


Name: janice weiss truitt
Date: 28 Aug 2007

Comments

i have been to the battlefield several times from about 1968 to 2000..i am glad to see if finally in the hands of those it belongs to...about the photo of crazy horse...i can see that it certainly resembles the man it is supposed to be of...i know this will be insulting, but i feel his mother was not lakota...he was too light skinned and had light brown hair...this would be no shame because we all remember the great comanche quanah parker who had a white mother, and descendants still living today


Name: SPC Shaunna Little Hawk
Date: 27 Aug 2007

Comments

I have read numerous articles and stories regarding Crazy Horse and the story of his life. Based on the readings and descriptions of his need to remain faithful to the native culture, I personally don't think he would have allowed his picture to be taken. Also, I have read many times that he was "very handsome, perfect in face and form, etc" and this guy just doesn't cut it..Sorry. As a descendant of Crazy Horse I continue to seek all types of literature on my grandfather and also continue to be proud of who I am. SPC Shaunna Maldacker, Oglala/Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe


Name: Steve Maguire
Date: 17 Aug 2007

Comments

After visiting Fort Abraham Lincoln, ND, and touring The Custers' home - I wanted to see the end result of The 7th Cavalry's journey that started in May of 1876. Although I have a good sence as to what we think happened, I can never begin to relate my sorrow for all the Native Americans that trusted us.


Name: Dick Cruse of Dubuque, IA
Date: 15 Aug 2007

Comments

As a very young child I happened upon a copy of the Quentin Reynolds book "Custer's Last Stand" published in 1951 by Random House. To a 10-year-old with a vivid imagination, this book sparked a life-long interest in the battle, and a year or so later my family had occasion to spend a few hours at LBH. This only fanned the flames of interest to the point that I have since visited 3 more times and read more than 35 books and countless articles on the battle. This experience has shown the fallacy of the original Reynolds book. Imagine, he quotes Custer and others during the height of battle while telling the story! Nonetheless, this book was the catalyst for my pursuit of more knowledge of events leading up to and subsequent to the battle, so it did have a good purpose. My dream is to someday begin my trek at Fort Abraham Lincoln and retrace as much as possible the route to LBH, and then to spend a few days at the site, not accompanied by family whose interest level is not nearly as high as mine. I check the webcam almost daily (Thanks to whomever is responsible for this service) and continue to look for ways to increase my knowledge of the events of June 25-27, 1876. This past Spring I was invited to present a class to three 8th grade American History classes at a local school after the teacher became aware of our mutual interest in LBH. My dream is that at least one of the students in those 3 classes may also get the interest to pursue the story. As an aside, trying to tell the story of this event in 42 minutes could be compared to trying to put 3 pounds of beans in a 2 pound bag. Thanks to all who work to preserve the story of this event. I found it so interesting that more attention has been paid to this battle and the loss of 263 lives than the Civil War Battle of Cold Harbor where several thousand were killed in a few minutes. The aura of mystery continues to this day and we who share this interest will continue that tradition. Thanks again!


Name: Lauren Dieterich
Date: 13 Aug 2007

Comments

First of all, I'll admit that I'm not a big fan of Lt. Col. Custer; but ,I am facasinated by history. Also, my great, great grandfather was on a first name basis with Custer.


Name: Bonnie Arrhenius
Date: 06 Aug 2007

Comments

I was so excited to see your site. I saw a comment on my great grandfather Private William Henry White in the Guest Book 2006. He was a member of F troop, 2nd Cavalry and was discharged in 1877. He had the frightful experience of viewing the Custer Battlefield the day after the Custer massacre, as well as having the painful duty of helping care for the dead and wounded men who had been with Major Reno in his engagement of the same period. He told his experiences to Dr. Thomas B. Marquis and also Jim Annin. He did marry Chief Crookedfoot daughter Julia. After her death he moved to Crow Agency and and became a guide and custodian of the Custer Battlefied Cemetery and Memorial Museum. I'm looking forward to taking my four small grandson to the battle field in the near future.


Name: J.K.Wilson.
Date: 06 Aug 2007

Comments

Custer had it coming.


Name: Gemma
Date: 05 Aug 2007

Comments

Hi. I just found your site as I was researching a relative, Salvador Mege who worked on a cyclorama of Custer's last stand in Kansas. Do you know if the picture on this website is of that cyclorama?

8/5/07 Hi Gemma: The picture at the top of each page is from Eric von Schmidt's "Here Fell Custer." You can learn more about Eric and his painting by visiting his website.


Name: Chris Andrew Henry C.D.
Date: 03 Aug 2007

Comments

what brave men died on that day,what they must have felt during the battle..it brings me much comfort that all involved will not be forgotton.


Name: Mr. David H. Levesque
Date: 28 Jul 2007

Comments

Thanks Custer, AND - American/indians.


Name: warsinthefall
Date: 22 Jul 2007

Comments

wow,i'm not even half way through,and i can feel Reno's desperation..quedos to the author. Lola,some great writing.


Name: Carlos E Rivera Frances
Date: 11 Jul 2007

Comments

I'm a military historian, and my specialty is the Civil War and Indian Wars in the USA and I like to express my interest to become soon a member in your association. I'm Ssgt Carlos E Rivera Frances, U.S. Air Force. My residence is in San Juan PR. I'm glad to meet you. Thanks: Att. SSGT Carlos E Rivera Frances.

7/11/07 Carlos: Thank you for posting in our guest book. We would be honored to have you join Friends. You can join through regular mail at the address noted at the bottom of each page on our website. Visit "How To Join" to learn about the different membership levels and to join online. Regards, Bob Reece


Name: christine Holmes
Date: 04 Jul 2007

Comments

Your site is great. I too like Carolyn Custer am looking for Nevins decendants... But also have the Custer album and many other books... its nice to see the family come to life in a differnt way than what pop culture has made them to be. thanks for bringing that history to life. Would by far off chance is there a list of Nevins family anyware in existance. thanks for all your hard work .. christine Holmes


Name: Rodney J. Smack
Date: 17 Jun 2007

Comments

Custer should have brought his Gattling Guns.


Name: Mollie Burleson
Date: 14 Jun 2007

Comments

It is a family tradition that some ancestor of mine named Keating was reported to have gone to the rescue of Custer and his men but arrived too late. I note that there was a Charles Keating listed here. Does anyone know anything about him?


Name: John S.
Date: 13 Jun 2007

Comments

Having just watched it, I applaud your excellent review of the HBO TV film "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee", noting its historical inaccuracies but rightly assessing the significance of the filmmakers' achievement. You may well be right that this is the first Western to truly incorporate the perspective of both sides.


Name: Kathleen Donaldson - OH
Date: 13 Jun 2007

Comments

Thank you for keeping the memory of the soldiers in the 7th Calvary alive. I am a relative of Capt. Myles Keogh and have been researching family history. The picture of Comanche is wonderful. I look foreward to visiting the battlefield in the future.


Name: John Bourdage
Date: 08 Jun 2007

Comments

I always enjoy looking through the website. Always interesting things to read and see. On the story of reburying Sitting Bull at the battlefield, that interests me as it cannot be done but still folks act like it will. The burying of folks at the battlefield is reserved for members, or past members, of the U.S. Armed Forces and those who worked for them (i.e. scouts) only. This is and always will be strictly observed!!! My heart goes out to Sitting Bull's decendents as I have been there to his grave and saw how it is disrespected by his own people. That is a shame and something does need to be done. But he cannot be buried at the battlefield. I'm sorry, but that's the way it is. It's the plain truth. The Crows won't allow it as it's on their land. I'm sure that if he was buried there (which would be against the law) and, I heard, that the replica of his cabin moved to the battlefield, that it wouldn't be long before the cabin is burned down and the body disapears. Why do I say that? Well, they (NPS) didn't do a thing when Russell Means and his henchmen trustpassed onto park property to desecrate the mass grave of veterans on Custer Hill, they won't do anything to stop whoever that trustpasses to raise the cabin and grab Sitting Bull. I think it would be best that the family look elsewhere for a more secure burial place for their ancestor because the battlefield cannot allow his burial there. Old Trail Town outside Cody, Wyoming would take Sitting Bull and the Cabin. The owner is a fantastic artist and would create a great and honorable gravesite for Sitting Bull and would be proud to have his cabin too. At least they could contact him and find out. Takes thinkin' on!


Name: Peter Lehmann, Alberta, Canada
Date: 06 Jun 2007

Comments

I have read several accounts of the battle, by both sides, with great interest and bitter sweet sadness. Your's is the most informative, and I tip my hat to you, thanks. I'm wondering if Henry Lehmann, I Company led by Capt. Miles Keough, might not be a distant relative of mine. I'm glad we can see the 'Indian Wars' with more clarity now and offer them all our deepest respect. They all fought well,,, bar none:)


Name: Kimberly J. Baird
Date: 05 Jun 2007

Comments

How do you do? I have developed a passion for history, especially the Civil War era and I looked up Brian Pohanka, since I had seen him many times on Civil War Journal. I am deeply saddened to hear he passed away two years ago. He seemed to be a wonderful man. I hope his wife, Cricket, is doing okay!! I lost my daddy almost four years ago, and he was a history buff. I miss sharing my thoughts and findings with him. Thank you for your time!!

6/14/07 Kimberly: Thank you for your thoughts regarding Brian. We miss him very much. Cricket is doing well. She's still very active in fundraising for Civil War Battlefield preservation and retains her membership with Friends. Regards, Bob Reece


Name: Carolyn Custer
Date: 04 Jun 2007

Comments

While searching for material on Nevin Custer I came across your site. Three times I've purchased a book called the "Custer Family Album", which is filled with photos of the family up through WW II. I look at those pictures and see my dad, my sons, my paternal grandmother, and my very own face. General Custer was a joyous man who married his one love and died doing what he did the best. I'm so proud to be part of the bloodline and to be able to look back in time at those rugged, etched faces and feel the connection pull at my heart. Thank you for keeping the heroes on both sides alive. Garry Owen. Carolyn Custer, TEXAS


Name: Gunter Prischl
Date: 03 Jun 2007

Comments

Thank you for a great and very informative website. My list of books on the Cheyenne will increase shortly (things take a bit longer, when you are living "Down Under" in Australia).


Name: Melodie B.
Date: 01 Jun 2007

Comments

I agree with you Mr.Pream!


Name: Tom Pream
Date: 01 Jun 2007

Comments

This is just fantastic! I think it is so wonderful that your organization has risen above all of the petty arguments and politics that permeates many of the other organizations associated with the "Battlefield". You have become what I always thought a cooperating association should be. I am very proud to have known many of your members and wish you all the very best in the future. Bravo!!!


Name: Sean McCaa
Date: 28 May 2007

Comments

I bumped into this site while searching for Doug Keller, only to find that he had passed two years ago. I worked as a volunteer at the battlefield in 1986 and 1987 along with my father and brother. Strangely enough, our accomodations were the "stone house", which was an interesting experience. We were surrounded by the greatest staff which included Doug Keller, Neil Mangum, Mardel Plainfeather, Jim Court (supt.), Mr. Parley (whom I have a great photo of him in full cav dress blowing a bugle, summer 1986). What a great bunch of people. I know many have ventured from the battlefield, retired, and some even returned. I enjoyed reading the memoriam about Doug on your site, the photos inspired me to pull mine out as it has been 20 years since I visited the battlefield. It is a shame, but my father passed in 1987 and life just seemed to hit overdrive and you just wonder where the time has gone, life really is short. Two of the best summers in my life were spent at the battlefield and not a week goes by that I don't reach back in my mind and share some of those memories with my friends and family. I still have the old copies of the "Battlefield Dispatch" in my archives. Those were some wonderful times. I remember always sneaking up on Doug and attempting to scare him and he wouldn't even look behind him, he would just rotate that cane from front to back like a fly swatter and crack me in the head. He single-handedly broke me from trying to scare people. I am glad I found your page and I hope to log a visit to the battlefield in the near future. Thanks for the opportunity to share my fond memories!! Sean McCaa

6/14/07 Sean: This is a great note -- thank you for posting. I'd love to see that photo of John Parley, which brings up more sad news. I heard through the staff at the battlefield that John Parley passed away a few years ago. I'm sorry to say I don't have more information than that. Regards, Bob Reece


Name: Marianne Schafer (CA)
Date: 24 May 2007

Comments

My great-great uncle was one of the first to arrive after the battle, as told by my grandfather. But he passed sometime ago, and having been a kid when he died, of course I hadn't asked the proper questions. But hopefully the internet and a little bit of time with help me answer those questions.


Name: Tom Kensil
Date: 22 May 2007

Comments

Your column "Dust to Dust" is probably the single most amazing piece I have ever read on the subject. And I have read a lot of books on CLS. Not to sound morbid, but it answers so much about the interment and I always wondered about all that. Those guys went down on a plain in the middle of nowhere. Where did you get all that info/sources? I am also reading Where Custer Fell as it has renewed my interest since I first got fascinated with the subject as a child.

May 22, Tom: Thank you for the nice comment. "Dust to Dust" takes me back two decades. I conducted the research from primary sources in the battlefield archives during the summer of 1985 while working as an interpreter. I reported to then Chief Historian and of Interpretation Neil Mangum.

During that summer the NPS provided one-page brochures to visitors. Each covered a specific topic relating to the battle story. Since I had been digging through the archives on the subject of the burials, I suggested that be one of the topics. Neil said, "Go for it." I still have one of those somewhere in my files. I also decided to expand the topic from one page to several in hopes that it might be published, so when I returned home I finished the paper and somehow forgot about it. I never submitted it for publication.

Last year, while going through old files, I found the paper. I realized that the fascinating subject about the many burials of Custer's dead was not covered in any detail on any website including Friends, so I decided to add it to the site.

Warm Regards, Bob Reece


Name: Bettylou H. Steadman
Date: 30 Jan 2007

Comments

I just found it interesting to see that someone else had my name.


Name: Patricia Creed nee Culley
Date: 28 Jan 2007

Comments

There is a family tradition that a Culley emigrated to America from Ireland, joined the cavalry and was killed at Little Big Horn with Custer. This came from a Squadron Sergeant Major Thomas Culley who served in 3rd The Kings Own Hussars for 21 years. His tour of duty extended from England, Egypt and India. Does anyone have a list of thoe casualities.


Name: Roger Custer
Date: 27 Jan 2007

Comments

Hello, My name is Roger Custer from Falls Church, VA and I believe I may be distantly related to General Custer. People always ask! My wife and I are planning a vacation to Custer Country in September and would like to find out if we are related to the General. We've joined the Friends and look forward to becoming involved and possibly meeting some of you when we visit this fall.


Name: EUGENEMOO
Date: 26 Jan 2007

Comments

Hope in 2007 go to lbh battle field in june22 23 24 25 to see last stand React the great Blunder in his life What on Custer Mind that Day wind or lose Hero or not More books being Sold Movie being made Like to see a Move being made and nat america side Eugene moore Jan 26/07


Name: Frank Copestick
Date: 23 Jan 2007

Comments

Can anyone tell me if they know anything about the Copestick that was in this company? If so I would greatly be in your thanks! Contact me at fcopestick@aol.com


Name: Ted Heath
Date: 22 Jan 2007

Comments

On the Wm. Heath submission of 1 17 07. Wm Heath survived the battle. I have an article from a newspaper saying that he died years later. If interested i would gladly fax the article to you. it talks of his family. I believe it said that they had his rifle that he used at the little big horn.


Name: Brad Lowe Liverpool PA
Date: 17 Jan 2007

Comments

I am looking for a list of US Cavalry casualties at Battle of Little Bighorn. Was there a soldier named Isaac Dasher from PA. Do you have any information about him? Thank you.

1/18/07 Brad: I checked at -- http://www.friendslittlebighorn.com/7th%20Cav%20Muster%20Rolls.htm -- where we have our list of soldiers at LBH and there is no Issac Dasher listed. I also checked the muster rolls for all the soldiers in the Sioux War of 1876 -- http://www.friendslittlebighorn.com/Roster--Sioux%20War.htm -- and he was not listed there either.


Name: MISS SONIA LIMM
Date: 17 Jan 2007

Comments

I am currently researching my family tree and believe my ancestor William Heath from Staffordshire England may have fought in Custers last Stand. The information on your site is very interesting and for someone who lives in England an invaluable insight into the battle. I would be interested in joining your club and hearing from anyone who could give me anymore information on William Heath.  ENGLAND

1/17/07 Miss Limm: Thank you for contacting us. Yes, your ancestor did fight with Custer. And, he died fighting in the Custer battalion under Company L which stood its ground on Calhoun Hill. William was born in 1848 in Staffordshire, England. He enlisted in the army in 1875 and would work as a farrier. He was nearly 5' 8" with blue eyes and brown hair.

He probably lies with his command in the mass grave on Last Stand Hill. Regards, Bob Reece


Name: Gwendalynn Dawnese Fuchs/Pale Fox/ Lunar Fox
Date: 15 Jan 2007

Comments

As a little girl I recall going to a Memorial that I believe was Last Stand Hill. I grew up in Sioux Falls,SD and My Mother and Father were both born and raised in Montana. There was a mass grave and I saw an Old Native American man standing there silently shedding a tear. Ionly about 7 years old and I cried too. I will never forget

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