Friends Of The Little Bighorn Battlefield

The Next Generation In The Study Of Custer's Last Stand

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Guest Book 2008

Name: Bill Yeske
Date: 24 Dec 2008
 

Comments

My first visit to Lbh in 2005 was interesting but I had no idea what I was looking at. Since then I have read 5 books on the Battle and I'm eager to get back this summer. One book I read has l/col Custer fatally wounded at the river and carried to last stand hill. Another has him fatally wounded at the hill. I'm confused but now more interested than ever. Thank u for this site.

12/25/08 Merry Christmas everyone. No need to worry, Bill, confusion is part of the experience when studying the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Itís the mystery of knowing one will never have all questions answered that is part of the fun. Regards, Bob


Name: Gay Jones
Date: 24 Dec 2008
 

Comments

The new winter photographs are just beautiful. Thanks to you and to John Doerner for sharing them.

12/25/08 Thanks Gay. Itís always a treat whenever John Doerner shares some of his winter photos of Little Bighorn Battlefield. Iíve heard from countless people who have enjoyed the photos. Thanks again, John. Regards, B.R.


Name: Antonio Amoruso
Date: 23 Dec 2008
 

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Merry Christmas to all Friends of LBH.

12/25/08 Merry Christmas Antonio. B.R.


Name: Ted Hiley
Date: 22 Dec 2008
 

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Very nice site. Walter Hiley and Jemima Forbes were my great grand parents and their son (my grand father) Charles Forbes Hiley came to the US in the early 1900s. The story is that granddad also had some family issues that caused him to leave England, first moving to Australia and then eventually settling in Florida. Several members of my family have done genealogy studies of both the Hiley and Forbes families over the years but it was not until a few years ago that my cousin James Hiley ran across this story. Looks like some additional information has been added since Jim mentioned this interesting ancestor to me.

12/22/08 Ted: It's an amazing moment when one learns a relative fought or died in the Battle of the Little Bighorn. John Stuart Forbes is a fascinating individual. For those interested, jump here to see his memorial in a church in Edinburgh and to learn more about him.


Name: Bob Schaller
Date: 11 Dec 2008
 

Comments

Visited the battlefield last a few years ago. Mr. Reece and the Friends helped me with some questions I had back then -- and whenever I "come back around for a revisit" this organization has this wonderful site to help. Just a post to say thanks for the great resource! This time, I'm reading the new book "A Terrible Glory" to see if there was anything new in it -- and of course a new book always rekindles my interest! Mr. Reece, it's great to see you are still kicking around here, and thank you, Friends of the Little Bighorn!

12/17/08 Good to hear from you Bob. I'm glad we could be of some help. "A Terrible Glory" has been a big seller. It has enabled a new generation to catch Little Bighorn Fever, somewhat like "Son of the Morning Star" did 23 years ago. We plan to keep on kicking for a long time to come. Please come back to visit. Regards, Bob


Name: Charles Ryburn
Date: 10 Dec 2008
 

Comments

I have always admired the lakota and their insight into the battle. Being from a native america. I wish to stand on the rivers edge some dayand look to the east, and remember from all my readings that "The Day Ended at Little Bighorn."

12/17/08 Charles: Some day you will make it to the battlefield. Plan on a mind-opening experience -- a good one. Regards, B.R.


Name: Ron Gorski
Date: 08 Dec 2008
 

Comments

Is there a video, a dvd or a vhs tape that shows the archeology work that was done with metal detectors after the fire of 1983. I know that I saw a special about it on a cable channel, but I cannot find a tape or disc of this program anywhere. Thank you for your help.

12/9/08 Ron: I am not aware of any such DVDs available online and haven't been able to locate any for a number of years. I do know a few are sold at the battlefield bookstore but they do not take phone or mail orders. I decided to check with a very good source -- Douglas Scott -- and in an email he informed me that, "there are no current DVDs on the digs available." Scott further stated that the only DVD he could find was, "Custer's Last TrooperĒ by Bill Armstrong. "It is sold through Amazon as the second part of a two DVD set called Legend of Custer. The title makes no mention of the Armstrong production.Ē

I checked both Amazon and Barnes & Noble online and Legend of Custer cannot be found any longer. There is a new documentary coming out in a few months on Discovery or History about the battle. It might cover a small bit on the digs. You'll find Doug Scott in that documentary and a rare look at Eric von Schmidt's painting "Here Fell Custer" which I was able to grant the producers permission to use via von Schmidt's daughter. Regards, Bob


Name: T . Ramsay
Date: 08 Dec 2008
 

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In Edgar Paxson's famous painting of Custer's Last Stand , what is the significence of the yellow flag carried by a soldier in the background ?

12/9/08 I used my sooper dooper magnifying glass to check out the yellow flag and even with that I can't make out what it is. It almost looks like the Regimental Standard but that is seen as the blue flag to the right. If anyone knows Paxon's painting well, maybe they can answer this question. Thanks, Bob


Name: Hodon21621@aol.com
Date: 04 Dec 2008
 

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John Burkman, Custer's orderly corresponded with Libbie Custer from about 1907 until Burkman committed suscide in 1925. Does anyone out there have any information on where I might find copies of these letters? I have some but am sure there are more, any help would be appreciated.


Name: StephenHoward-Brown 10 PARA.
Date: 03 Dec 2008
 

Comments

I find from the outset of this operation that the Commanders failed to acquire the proper Intelligence about the location of enemy forces, their strength and weaknesses. Lt/Col Custer failed to give adequate support to Major Reno after the initial advance to contact with the main Forces of the enemy in the Village location. The Battle preparations were inadequately planned,the poor reconnaissance before the advance to contact spelt the inevitable doom of the pitifully small numbers of American soldiers required to carry out the mission. This was an example of how not to manage a mission and most of all a Firefight. L/Col Custer should be shown to be an inadequate officer, who showed total disregard for the given mission, who sacrificed his men through his arrogance, poor judgement of military ethics, and crass stupidity. He will go down in history as an idiot and a shining example of the sort of Commander no soldier should ever venture near, least of all follow his orders!


Name: Lea Griffith
Date: 02 Dec 2008
 

Comments

Thanks so much for the fantastic website! My family made a 4000 mile road trip in May and by mere accident had the great fortune to end up at LBH on Memorial Day. Though it was very cold and windy, we enjoyed one of the most breath taking memorial services I have ever experienced. I have long been enamored with Native American history - my distant ancestors were Cherokee - and the day spent at LBH was the highlight of my trip. I learned much while there, but I was so engrossed in experiencing everything first-hand I'm afraid most of it didn't sink in. It's great to be able to visit your sight and compare stories and pictures with my own memories and pictures. I was shocked to learn that there are so few warrior markers at the site, and that they only began placing them so recently. As someone pointed out, it doesn't give visitors a real picture of the battle. My first thought after driving through the entire battlefield was, "Wow! The cavalry got their butts kicked!" since I saw so few red markers in relation to the number of white markers. I now understand the red markers are incomlete. Despite my frustration about lesser representation for the Native American fallen warriors, my visit there was nothing short of spiritual. Many thanks for a fantastic website where I can revisit memories of experiencing history first-hand.

12/9/08 Lea: Your trip to LBH sounds great. I'm glad to hear that our website helps you revisit LBH anytime you want. Regards, B.R.


Name: Elsie Kettmann
Date: 30 Nov 2008
 

Comments

Saw an excellent presentation of the LBH battle, spotlighting Major Reno and his troops ( History Channel, 11/29.08). Was most interesting to note that Gen. Crook "went south" and was uable to fulfill his part of the engagement. Gave an entirely different view of the battle. More or less confirmed my opinion of G.A, Custer.

12/17/08 Elsie: Thanks for your comment. I highly recommend Neil Mangum's book, "Battle of the Rosebud: Prelude to the Little Bighorn" to gain a full understanding of why Crook went south. It will explain much better than a documentary ever could. Regards, Bob


Name: Ian Clark
Date: 25 Nov 2008
 

Comments

Looking at this from Oswestry, England and its facinating: a balanced and very insightful soucre both for understanding of the battle and subsequent controversies.

12/17/08: Thanks for visiting us all the way from England, Ian. Hope you come back. Regards, Bob


Name: Quanah Parker Brightman
Date: 24 Nov 2008
 

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My Name is Quanah Parker Brightman. I am The Great Great Grand Son of Dogs Back Who Fought and Died at The Battle of Little Big Horn. Here is a News Clipping The Brightman's Would Like You To Include With His Profile. His Son Henry Kingman Talks About The Battle of The Little Big Horn. http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t291/LehmanBrightman/HenryKingman.jpg


Name: Robert Madsen
Date: 19 Nov 2008
 

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I enjoyed reading about Corporal Foley and the marker that was erected for him in 2007. I would be very interested to learn any details regarding how it was decided that his marker should be placed at that exact spot.

12/9/08 Robert: John Doerner researched before deciding where to place the marker. Of course, no one -- not even the chief historian at LIBI -- can say for sure where Foley fell.


Name: Antonio Amoruso
Date: 11 Nov 2008
 

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Come precedentemente detto, ho due perplessita' che esprimero' in italiano perche' non parlo inglese. 1) nella sezione " 7th lesdership structure" leggo che il 2lt Hodgson era nella compagnia B. Nella sezione " Custer's last stand" leggo che la compagnia B giunse a "Reno hill" in un secondo momento, quindi non partecipo' allo scontro nella valle del LBH che fu sostenuto dalle compagnie A-G-M. Come mai, nella sezione "Medaglie per azioni individuali", leggo che il soldato Benjamin Criswell recupero' il corpo del 2lt Hodgson dalla riva est del LBH? 2)Chi ha notato l'azione individuale del soldato Richard Hanley della compagnia C se questa fu totalmente distrutta a sudovest di "Calhoun hill"? Sarei lieto di poter chiarire questi miei dubbi. Grazie.


Name: Antonio Amoruso
Date: 11 Nov 2008
 

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Name: geoff the aussie
Date: 11 Nov 2008
 

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once again a terrific site bob....i know chief plenty coup of the crows didnt participate in the lbh battle.....but can u tell me if he and crazy horse ever crossed lances so 2 speak?.....do u know where the lone tipi was located?.......cheers...geoff

12/17/08 Thanks again, Geoff. There are two possible locations for the Lone Tipi, but no one can say for sure.


Name: massimo hotamitaneo
Date: 11 Nov 2008
 

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Antonio,non sei solo!!


Name: Antonio Amoruso
Date: 01 Nov 2008
 

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Ciao a tutti. Sono appassionato di storia degli Stati Uniti. Trovo questo sito fantastico e lo seguo da mesi. Ho due perplessita', ma non parlo americano per cui non riesco ad esprimerle. Se c'e' qualcuno che parla italiano e volesse contattarmi puo' farlo al seguente indirizzo : mrokm@libero.it grazie.

11/1/08 Antonio: Thank you for your kind comments regarding our website. To our readers: Antonio has expressed his passion for U.S. history and has been visiting the Friends website -- which he finds "fantastic" -- for months. He has some questions about the battle but does not speak English. He's hoping someone who speaks or writes Italian would contact him. I don't like leaving personal emails on this guestbook, but will in this case hoping that one of our Italian members will contact Antonio. After someone has contacted Antonio and answered his questions, please send an email to me to let me know so I can erase his email address. When you email me, please note date of Antonio's original post in this guestbook. Grazie, Bob Reece


Name: Barb Souchick
Date: 30 Oct 2008
 

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Hello, I am fascinated reading this information! I have been told all my life that I am related to Chief Sitting Bull so am anxious to find out if this is true. We did contribute our DNA to the National Geographic DNA Project. Can you tell me who in Eurpoe has the DNA and how to go about getting results. Also the family tree that Mr. LaPointe references in the interview, is that posted on line anywhere? Thankyou.

10/30/08 Barb: I'll check with Ernie LaPointe to see how one contributes DNA. I imagine there have to be valid controls in place to determine who can submit DNA because the procedure is expensive. No controls, then everyone will ask to have their DNA tested. The LaPointe family tree is not currently online. Regards, Bob


Name: geoff the aussie stallmann
Date: 28 Oct 2008
 

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thnx bob...i'll b making my 5th trip 2 lbh on november 21st / 22nd this year....i know it'll probably b snowing?...but ive always wanted 2 c the battlefield in winter...we would love 2 meet u...is that a possibility?..we r then heading 4 the rosebud....cheers....geoff australia

10/30/08 Geoff: Glad to hear you'll make the trip to the battlefield. Unfortunately, I live 500 miles south of the battlefield so we might miss meeting up on this trip. November can still be a good time of year to visit the battlefield. Believe it or not, there might not be snow, but dress warm! Regards, Bob


Name: Brian Burgess
Date: 27 Oct 2008
 

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Hi Bob,I would be happy to send you details of my father and his artwork hes a real character.It would give him great pleasure to meet with you and ime sure you would enjoy his company as you share a passion in LBH and native american culture.I can email pictures and newspaper articles about him and his work or you can google him Brian Burgess Liverpool artist and you should get an idea of what he does.We hope to travel over early spring 09.We are also hoping to have MR LAPOINTE open my fathers exibition here in Liverpool next year.My father has spoken with MR LAPOINTE on the phone and he has kindly agreed to this now we are confirming and sorting dates to fit.We will seek to use his visit to promote native american culture and create some discussion this side of the pond,we will endevour to promote the fine work you are doing at FLB.anyway imust stop now butlook forward to meeting and once again thanks and best wishes to all FLB.REGARDS BrianJnr

10/30/08 Brian: Thanks a bunch. Please click on "Contact" at the bottom of every page and send me a note. Regards, Bob


Name: Ruth McConnell
Date: 27 Oct 2008
 

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Do you have a complete listing of the soldiers that died during the battle of Little Big Horn? It is listed in a Family Bible that a great uncle, Jonathan McConnell, was "lost" at the battle. But I have not been able to verify this. Any ideas?

10/27/08 Ruth: We do have a list of soldiers in "The Battle" Section. Click on the navigation button above, then click on "Soldiers and Warriors" from the navigation buttons at right and follow the links from there. Regards, Bob


Name: Gary D. Schott
Date: 26 Oct 2008
 

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Born and raised in Montana and growing up with the battle always being discussed, you have created a wonderful, informative site. So easy to get information with the click of a button. It's taken me years of reading, research and writing to people gathering information I have. Your site is fantastic, also, just about the time I think I know all about the battle I learn something new. Thanks for all your hard work.

10/26/08 Gary: Thank you kindly for such nice comments. I'm glad to hear that you are finding information on our website easily and that it is valuable. The newest item I recently added to the site is a review for the new book, Inkpaduta: Dakota Leader. You can also read an interview I had with its author, Paul Beck.

I've been building this site for eight years now and I'm proud to say that in all those eight years I've never included ads and never plan to. You'll never have to deal with a pop-up ad on this website. I hope that you might consider joining our organization. It's a great group of people dedicated to helping the National Park Service manage the battlefield. Jump here to learn about some of the Friends accomplishments over the years. If you decide to join, jump here for information on how to join online. Regards, Bob


Name: brian burgess
Date: 16 Oct 2008
 

Comments

Fantastic site.disovered whilst researching for my father an artist from liverpool,england.he has been painting native amerian indians for 40 years and we are now preparing to exibit these works and will be visiting lbh and asmany other sites early 2009 with a view to bringing this exibition to america.hopefully we can make a donation to your organisation when we arrive.many thanks and kind regards to all friends of LBH

10/26/08 Thanks Brian. I'd like to learn more about your father. If you don't mind, please contact me at your convenience before you travel to the states. Regards, Bob Reece


Name: geoff stallmann
Date: 11 Oct 2008
 

Comments

gday and what a terrific site this is.. could you please tell me whats happened to captain tom custers medals of honor? did he wear them on that fatefull day? p.s.charlene..if you look at the history of mankind..in 1 way shape or form man has committed shamefull acts upon 1 another..here in australia..europe and the united states..im not saying this is right but i am saying thats just how it was.. please answer me this charlene.. which race of people in the history of mankind doesnt have blood on their hands? the answer is quite simple not 1 single race..not 1 charlene im a very proud australian and im sure americans are proud to be american.. cheers geoffrey stallmann..brisbane australia

10/26/08 Geoff: Our military do not wear such medals in the field or in combat. Most don't wear them except at very special functions. Last I heard about Tom's medals is that they were up for sale in an auction many years ago, but did not sell. They're in private hands at this time. Regards, Bob


Name: Charlene (Indian at heart)
Date: 10 Oct 2008
 

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I have studied the battle, and much of our political agenda's as well as Native American History. I am always surprised how many people do not know the truth. Gen. Custer, had been raiding the Indian villages prior to Little Big Horn. He had massacre not just warriors, but women and children. He was bent on genocide. Our American flag, with every strip, and star is stained with Indian Blood. We have been a country that has talked a lot about freedom, yet we took that very thing away from the American Indian. We placed them in the first concentration camps, that is how I truly see the reservations. In many reservations they were not allowed to leave without permission. My husband is Native American, Cherokee, and his ancestors were part of the trail of tears. When I took him to the Little Big Horn, he was pleased to find it named Little Big Horn, and not Custer's Last Stand. The Native Americans were fighting for their freedom, and right to exist. Let us never forget that. NEVER!


Name: John Wyman
Date: 05 Oct 2008
 

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Thanks for your WEB site, I like seeing the pictures of Montana. I am trying to find a picture of Lt. Riley who's real name was Lt. Wyman from Ft. Missoula where he was a civil engineer there. There was a article in the Missoula newspaper that had him court marshaled right before the battle of the Bighorn. I was told that Custer came to Ft. Missoula before the battle. I went to the battlefield when I was a child, and there was a marker for a private Wyman. I know more about the battle but what I am trying to prove is that of reincarnation,Lt. Wyman looks alot like myself. I was told he was allowed to haunt the battlefield and showed up to a park employee several times in uniform. Do you know anything about that? I was told that the native american that narates the battle changes what he says time from time, and that those there know about it. Anyway thanks for the pictures. Andy Rooney of 60 Minutes knows something about this, he did a segment on the civil engineer that layed out Ft. Missoula, and that he considered it a poor piece of workmanship. Please watch for a miracle in the next year at this site, I would be willing to bet that God will back up my claims, he is the source of the information that I have. One more thing, God told me that some of the paintings are from pictures taken there. God placed a painter or man to take pictures on the battle, so that the actual history could be recorded. Lt. Riley (Wyman) was in one of them, he was instructed to get down behind his horse as told by the miltary training. He was first stationed at Ft. Vancouver Wa I believe. He had more than one wife, that is the reason why he was court marshaled by the US Army. There is a picture of him here at the Eugene City Library, that is how I first came to know how he looked.


Name: Ed Vetter
Date: 30 Sep 2008
 

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My father mentioned his grandfather went to America in the 1870's and was killed with Gen. Custer at the little bighorn. I did some research and found his name as one of the soldiers who died with gen, Custer. his name was Michael Johan Vetter, Private in Co L,I am trying to verify if he is indeed my GREAT GREAT GRAND FATHER, any tips

10/4/08 I'm terrible with genealogy research, Ed. You'll need to research your family tree and I apologize, but we cannot help you with that endeavor. Regards, B.R.


Name: Paul Alan
Date: 30 Sep 2008
 

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there is a lot of information on where the majority of the cavalry soldiers are buried. What about the Indians? Where are they buried?

10/4/08 Thatís a great question, Paul. We know where Custerís Crow scouts are buried Ė in the Custer National Cemetery at the battlefield (see photos). However, we do not know where the Indian warriors are buried. All were immediately removed from the battlefield by their family or loved ones and buried according to their tribal customs: the Lakota usually placed the remains on scaffolds in the trees (Gibbonís soldiers saw some of those burial sites when they entered the valley adjacent to the killing ground) and the Cheyenne usually interred the remains in caves (most along the foothills of the Bighorn Mountains). Regards, B.R.


Name: Alan edward yates
Date: 24 Sep 2008
 

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could e Yates please contact me through these pages my father was Donald Leroy Yates I am researching my family tree and I know nothing about the Yates side except George Yates was my great great great grande father as I live in England its hard to find things out.


Name: Rosemary Hoyt
Date: 24 Sep 2008
 

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Enjoyed the article on Interment of the Custer Dead. Do you know where Donald McIntosh was "brought from back east?" Was it Congressional Cemetery, where Molly and Kate Garrett's parents are buried? Thanks, Rosemary

10/4/08 Good question, Rosemary. McIntosh is buried at Arlington Cemetery, Site I-107D. See our list of where soldiers are buried (from that page click on "Little Bighorn Soldier Graves"). Regards, B.R.


Name: Rosemary Hoyt
Date: 24 Sep 2008
 

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My husband is Francis Marion Gibson's great grandson. We are going to Arlington Cemetery. We always understood that Francis Marion claimed his bother-in-law's body. In Interment of the Dead it states that his body was brought to Ft. Lincoln from back east.

10/4/08 Rosemary: Gibson is buried at Arlington, Section W-W, Site Lot 107. See link to our list of soldier burials in your comment immediately above. Regards, B.R.


Name: Geoff Stallmann
Date: 24 Sep 2008
 

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gday..is there a marker where the lone tipi containing a dead warrior was? If so, where is it located? cheers from Australia

10/4/08 Geoff: There is not a marker designating where the Lone Tipi was located. Regards, B.R.


Name: Joe Simertz
Date: 14 Sep 2008
 

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In 1958 my parents brought me to the Little Bighorn Battlefield and the image stayed engrained in my memory. As I grew up and read different books about the battle, I could still see last stand hill. I finally returned this last Tuesday 9/9. I started at Gary Owen, then at the National Monument. I rode all the way down to the Reno/Benteen field and back stopping at every opportunity to see all the folds, fields, ridges, markers and draws to capture the essense of the place. I took the walk down to deep ravine and back. I am left with more questions than answers from my visit. I am impressed with the preservation of the site. Guess I have some more books to read to see if I can't come to a personal conclusion.

9/14/08 Joe: Thanks for sharing so well your experience while visiting the battlefield last week. I would suggest reviewing our list of the most important books about this subject. Any of them will help you with that adventure of discovering the events around the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Regards, B.R.


Name: Craig DiBenedictis
Date: 10 Sep 2008
 

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Visiting this battlefield is an amazing experience. I sometimes wonder, while I'm there, what it would be like to ride horseback over the same terrain that Custer and his men rode on the way to the battlefield just hours beforehand. Great website and lots of terrific information to make future visits more meaningful.

9/10/08 Craig: Only on very rare occasions does the NPS allow horses onto the battlefield. That would be an incredible experience to ride a horse along Battle Ridge. Thanks for the kind words about our website. BTW -- I did email you twice. Not sure if you received my emails? Thanks, Bob


Name: Richard Tilford
Date: 03 Sep 2008
 

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Lead major Joseph Green Tilford See Google


Name: Richard Tilford Sept 1,2008
Date: 01 Sep 2008
 

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The party at the perment camp was put on under the tent by the laed major Joseph Green Tilford my great grandfather(Re"Google) to see all the photos garry owen Richard


Name: Emmet O'Connell Limerick
Date: 28 Aug 2008
 

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Hi Bob, have just been reading the visitors book and the comments are excellent your piece on Lt. Porters revolver is very interesting and again I must compliment this site it is very informative and a must for anyone with an interest in the battle Great work Bob


Name: Wandering Bear
Date: 19 Aug 2008
 

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1973 FEB. 27: MEMBERS OF AMERICAN INDIAN MOVEMENT SEIZE CHURCH AT WOUNDED KNEE AND BEGIN 71 DAY STAND OFF WITH FBI AND LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS. <quote> I was at the Second Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1973. It started as a peaceful protest march for Native American rights. It was the Federal government that fired the first shot on the peace protesters ( Men, Women,and Children)which lead the American Indian movement to barricade it self in the church at wounded knee. http://hippieland.100megsfree5.com/wanderingbear/


Name: P.Fazzini
Date: 16 Aug 2008
 

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Were Custer's pistols captured by Spotted Wolf and White Elk?

10/4/08 Sorry, but we'll most likely never know the answer to that question. Regards, B.R.


Name: P.Fazzini
Date: 16 Aug 2008
 

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Sirs Of Interest: 1) In February 1985 issue of magazine "The Gun Report" is a report "A Custer Battlefield Gun".pp.25-31 of a .31 cap and ball pistol found 1897 on Battlefield. 2) 3) In regard to Red horse drawings of Indian casualites-has anyone tried to fit names to pcitures?

10/4/08 I'm not aware of fitting names to the pictures. If someone knows, please post on this guestbook. Regards, B.R.


Name: P.Fazzini
Date: 16 Aug 2008
 

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Sir 1) Was Sgt O'Hara's remains found on Reno HIll 1950's? 2) In regard to unknown soldier reburied June 1986-possible IDs? 3) Was part of Lt Stugis skull found on the battlefield? 3) In regard to Unknown Soldier reburied June 1986-possible IDs?

10/4/08 Some remains have been identified. I suggest reading Douglas Scott's excellent book about that research, They Died With Custer. Regards, B.R.


Name: geoff stallmann australia
Date: 15 Aug 2008
 

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gday and what a terrific site..I've been fortunate enough to visit a number of battlefields a few years back: Big Hole, Bear Paw Mountains, Sand Creek, Washita and of course the Fetterman massacre site and the Little Bighorn. The feelings I felt at these incredible places in history are mixed with sadness but also with exhilaration... more soon... once again truly a magnificent site.. Geoff

10/4/08 Thanks for the kind words Geoff. I've been to all of those battlefields except for Bear Paw. Still want to get there someday. Regards, B.R.


Name: Charles Casey
Date: 12 Aug 2008
 

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In the 1980s I spent many times at the Custer battlefield as it was called having spent many years reading all I could about the Indian wars and this battle in particular. Living in Maine I decided to look up Lt.  James Porter's family grave in the town of Strong Maine. His family owned the wood working mill there. I found the grave and family home. The grave was interesting as on the side of the stone it said Lt. James Porter killed at Custer massacre. The family home is now a bed and breakfast and in great condition. I had talked to Brian Pohanka and he sent me pictures of the church draped in black with two cavalry swords on alter. Of course he is not buried there but I thought this might interest readers.

8/12/08 Charles: Thank you very much for sharing this with us. You might be interested in reading about Porter's revolver returning to the battlefield for a short visit. Jump here -- scroll down until you reach the section, "Lt. Porter's Revolver." Regards, B.R.


Name: Joseph A. Wiggs
Date: 10 Aug 2008
 

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I have been very fortunate to have visited the battlefield on two occasions. I hope to return soon. I remember that each visit was accented by an inexplicable sadness that overwhelmed me. It seemed to me, at the time, that both the Whites and the Native Americans suffered a tremendous loss that can never be reconciled. I truly hope that I am afforded an opportunity to return before I leave this physical plane. So many questions so many unknown answers. I would also like to thank Bob, and his associates, for the wonderful job they are doing.

8/12/08 Joe: I know how important your trip was to the battlefield -- your deep reactions are well received and very true. I hope you do get to make it back again and soon. Thank you for your kind words for all of us that are part of Friends. All my best, Bob.


Name: Elaine Luiz
Date: 01 Aug 2008
 

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Every time I look at Martin's work, I am amazed over and over again.


Name: Mike Rodgers
Date: 26 Jul 2008
 

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Hi I'm from New Zealand 60 years old grew up reading every thing i could get my hands on about the Little Big Horn traveling to Canada next year plan on a first visit great web site

7/2/708 Mike: I've heard from some of your fellow citizens who made the long trip to LBH from N.Z. and they did not regret it one bit. Please let us know how your first visit to Last Stand Hill affected you. B.R.


Name: David Durban , Paris (France)
Date: 26 Jul 2008
 

Comments

Hi - I found your website very interesting , it makes us relive the battle, how everything has began on that fatal day for Custer and the 7th cavalry. I have a great respect for the victims on both sides but Native Americans only fought to preserve their way of life and their Land! May the Great Spirit bless them all forever. Custer didn't expect to face so well trained warriors. I've visited the Battlefield two years ago and I would say that I felt some things out there, something's still alive and breathtaking. I'll head back there this summer with the same interest and pleasure...  thanks; David Durban.

7/27/08 David: We're pleased you're finding good things from our website. It's always great to hear from our international friends. Enjoy your visit to LBH. B.R.


Name: Kym Keogh
Date: 22 Jul 2008
 

Comments

Hi, I found your website when I was looking for information on Keogh and Forbes at Little Big Horn. My step-dad, H. Forbes, was very interested in an article my sister found about our two families being there. I wanted to do some research and provide him with a little more information and the two memorial sites were very interesting. If you have any further knowledge of their roles and whether they interacted much during the battle, I'd appreciate knowing more. PS. I was very pleased to read your thoughtful comments to Corky Reed.

7/27/08 Kym: It's amazing that your family comes from two different families who had relatives that fought and died at the LBH. Very interesting question on if Forbes and Keogh interacted during the battle. Since Forbes was assigned to Company E and Keogh to I, it is difficult to imagine they had any interaction considering those soldiers were very busy. B.R.


Name: Brian Berry Pa-NY
Date: 16 Jul 2008
 

Comments

Ps-I have been a student of Custer and the battle since a child and I found the bookstore incredibly wonderful. My fiancťe found for $1.00 at a secondhand store what may be one of the most informative books on the subject: A first edition (1953) of "The Custer Myth" by Colonel W. A. Graham. It still had the original dust jacket and was in pristine condition! I know there are copies out there. Anyone truly interested in the battle should find a copy. that's all and thanks again for a great site. I will revisit often.

7/27/08 Brian: "The Custer Myth" is one of the most important books released on this subject. It is in our top 18 books listed in our bookstore. I envy you for being able to find a first edition for only $1.00. I'm starting to think that book dealer didn't really understand what he had! B.R.


Name: Brian Berry-PA via NY
Date: 16 Jul 2008
 

Comments

I visited the battlefield at the end of May 1995 during a 3 week trip to Cody, Wyoming and parts of Montana. I returned to the Battlefield in mid June on the return back east. What struck me was that in the 2 weeks between visits the grass had grown at least 2 feet. It's quite a place. A solemn lonely place. I would love to stay at the motel there( I think there was one). But between the museum, the lecture, the artifacts and the Ranger's tour it was an excellent experience. I encourage anyone even remotely interested in the battle to visit. One can read about it and watch shows about it on TV but to stand there is a whole other surreal experience. As to your site, it's GREAT!

7/27/08 Brian: It's always great to hear of someone's great experience while visiting at LBH. You're right, experiencing the Little Bighorn Battlefield, firsthand, beats them all. B.R.


Name: Jeff Martin - Colorado
Date: 05 Jul 2008
 

Comments

Just got back from the Battlefield, in fact, we were there one day after the 132nd anniversary (around 5:30 pm - time the battle was fought) and got to listen to Mike Donahue's lecture - riveting! Have since been reading all I can thru this site. Question: The archeology report, in 30 years every metal detector hobbyist will want to know what kind/type detectors were used. I think it would make sense to capture that info now before it is lost. Every piece of info about the battlefield is interesting and I can see folks interested in 'antique' detectors of 2004 vs 'new' ones in 20-30 years. Also, as I walked the deep ravine trail, I noticed a lone marker flag to the west of the trail ( maybe 10-15 yards off the trail) closer to the trail end. Did NPS miss that marker...what's it there for. Thanks for a great site! PS I have an old Winchester 66...could I have the firing pin examined to see if it was in the Battle?

7/27/08 Jeff: I am checking on the kind of metal detectors used during the digs and will post here. It's amazing how technology has improved dramatically for archeologists since the archeological dig at LBH in 1984. One of the most important is ground penetrating radar which can locate anomalies in the ground. The technology isn't available yet that can identify what the anomaly is, but I'll bet someday it will. B.R.

Update: I contacted Friends member John Husk who participated in the digs during the 1980s. I figured heíd be able to enlighten us. Not only did he do just that, but he sent me a photo from the cover of the September 1985 issue of Treasure magazine which covered the May 1985 dig conducted at the Reno-Benteen Battlefield. The photo was reversed (who knows why) and the soldier headstone was added but it shows you an example of the detectors used 23 years ago.

Here is what John says regarding what kind of metal detectors were used during the digs in the 1980s:

ďI can't tell you the model of the metal detectors but can say that the Garrett, White and Fisher were the principal brands on the field. Occasionally someone would show up with another brand. The Fisher rep was one of the people doing the detecting so his were the most up to date. I was using a Garrett ADS, VLF/TR Deepseeker with two different sized heads depending on the conditions and the weight of the head at the end of the day and Ron Nichols was using a White. The battlefield bought either a White or Fisher during or right after the dig in 85. At that time, they were the top of the line metal detectors for the early to mid 80's. Nothing like the computerized metal detectors that are out there now.

In the photo, I am in the front, Ron is in the yellow shirt and the Fisher rep is in the red and white baseball cap wearing a t-shirt with an orange vest over it. This photo is reversed but was on Reno-Benteen. I have a hand-held Garrette on my belt. The granddaddy of the wands they use in airports now. Also I had a 'handle with arm rest' that I am using in the photo which allowed me to take the head and shaft off the metal detector instrument box. That way I could hang the box over my shoulder and just use the handle, shaft and head for reduced weight.Ē
 


Name: Nick Spillane
Date: 26 Jun 2008
 

Comments

I only just stumbled onto this website a couple of days ago after finishing Donovan's book also. Just a great site, thanks. I've read about the Battle and about Western history generally for a long time, and one of these days I would like to realize the dream of visiting the battlefield.

7/27/08 Nick: Hope you can make the trip someday soon. You won't regret it. B.R.


Name: Sean C. Harkess
Date: 25 Jun 2008
 

Comments

I came across this site today. Almost done reading James Donovan's amazing new book "A Terrible Glory." I found this site through the Park Service official site. I have always been fascinated by Custer, the Indian wars and the west having grown up in Cheyenne, WY. Will join up soon! Thank you

June 25 - Hi Sean: Sounds like youíve enjoyed Donovanís book. Obviously, itís inspired you to learn more which easily happens to most people once theyíve read something regarding this subject. Plus, youíve found this site which has been online for nearly nine years. Iíve chosen to keep all content online from its inception in order for new visitors to read what others have read over these many years. If you havenít found it already, I suggest you visit the Table of Contents of this website. There, you can find reference to all the articles inside this huge website on subjects ranging from: the battle, archeology of the battle, history of the warrior markers, tons of photos, and so much more. It's good to hear you'll join our membership. Hopefully, we'll see you on Last Stand Hill in the future. Thanks again, Bob Reece


Name: emmetoconnell
Date: 25 Jun 2008
 

Comments

I visited the Little Big Horn battlefield on the 126th anniversary in June 2002 and I sincerely hope that todayís visitors enjoy it as much as I did. To think that on this day 132 years ago the famous fight took place and all these years later Custer still has us under his spell, to all visitors to the LBH battlefield enjoy it.

June 25: Thanks, Emmet, for taking the time to post in our guest book on this historical day. The Friends and this website exists to help with management of the battlefield. Itís always great to hear about the visitorís experience when at Little Bighorn Battlefield such as yourself. Hope to hear of your return soon. Regards, B.R.


Name: Calamity Jane
Date: 21 Jun 2008
 

Comments

Great site, good work www.cj1only.com


Name: Al Johnson
Date: 20 Jun 2008
 

Comments

I'm from Trail B.C. Canada and visited the battlefield site on June 12th, 2008 with my daughter and son-in-law. We were only passing through so didn't have much time but from what I did see it was fantastic. I intend to return for a more extended visit and tour. Sitting Bull,Crazy Horse, Gall and Lame White Man fought a courageous battle. It's sad they couldn't also win the war. A.J.

It's good to hear you visited the battlefield and that it has inspired you to return. I'll see you on Last Stand Hill. Regards, Bob Reece


Name: Ron Rigell
Date: 16 Jun 2008
 

Comments

I grew up with the vision of early TV and way it depicted the fight at the Little Big Horn. I watched as Errol Flynn stood on the hill alone with that saber in his hand fighting until the end. After reading, Son of Morning star, I decided on finally visiting the place my boyhood fantasies lie. I believe my first visit was June 25, 1989, a Sunday, the actual day of the battle 113 years earlier. I drove from Houston with my wife, my niece Adrienne, and her niece Nikki. It was a nice trip and one I anticipated extremely. Our last stay before the visit was in Sheridan, WY and there did I discover the camp of Crook and his men after the battle of the Rosebud, a little more than a week before the fight at Little Bighorn. The morning we left Sheridan I wore a nice rendition of a cavalryman's uniform as I saw it, not totally accurate, but a little Hollywood and a little authentic, and I wore it with pride. I know the others in my party did not totally appreciate the day, it was warm and that night we saw heat lightning as the troopers did during the night after the battle, but I so enjoyed the visit that I have since been back at least 5 times and I am planning on coming for the 132 anniversary. But I guess the visit I enjoyed the most and really touched me ......was probably June, 2001...when taps was played from the hill......one time by a trumpeter and another by a park ranger.....I believe they were played simultaneously.....in different directions of the valley. How do I feel about George A. Custer, now? After reading, Custer's Luck, a must read for any person truly interested in the fight, I still admire his courage, his leadership, his ambition and his recklessness.......yes, it was a race war of sorts and all about territory....the eminent domain...civilization, the approaching 20th century, the Presidential race of '76....and is "Audie" in Valhalla? Of course he is.....of course.

Thanks for the thoughtful post, Ron. Regards, B.R.


Name: M Callaway
Date: 15 Jun 2008
 

Comments

I will be visiting the LBH this summer. I have always been interested in history and archeology. I have always had an interest in trying to understand the reason why men go to war. Your web site gave me an insight in to what men do after the war. I knew a man who had been on the 1881 burial party as private. His story was a more scratching commentary. My grand mother was Lakota so I always tended to side against Custer. I am glad the Indian soldiers are being honored as well. I believe there should be an international monument honoring all men women and children, all races, all nations that have survived or died in all wars. I will be the old coot on the motorcycle. I am looking for camp sites in the area Ė I am on a very limited budget, cheap is good. Will be arriving Mid July. No schedule, probably should be home by first snow. Any local information would be helpful. Peace and long life.

Please visit our travel page for more information.


Name: M Myers
Date: 10 Jun 2008
 

Comments

Hello - I am planning a trip to LBH soon. I am very much interested in knowing the spot where Lt. B. Hodgson was "carried" across the river by a passing infantryman - possibly Frank Myers (a bugler?) in F Company (although another soldier is credited with this action)- by grabbing on to the stirrup of the passing rider... any information will be much appreciated.

I did send you an email, M. Thanks for posting. Regards, B.R.


Name: Keith Simon
Date: 06 Jun 2008
 

Comments

Is it possible that Custer was shot off his horse by White Cow Bull at or even in the LBH river? WCB's account and its description of a soldier leader wearing a buckskin jacket, riding a sorel horse with 4 stockings and a white star on it's face, also caring a long range hunting rifle and wearing a wide brimmed hat would seem to point ONLY to Custer. It would also seem to agree with accounts that the soldiers were initially met with the gunfire of only about a dozen mostly Cheyenne warriors and how could a Cavalry force much larger than 12 Indians be stopped at the water's edge. Also Crow scout Curley describes several soldiers shot off their horses at the at the Minicoujou (sp?) Ford at the center of the Indian Village and at the end of Medicine Trail Couley. What is the opinion of the majority of the historians in "Friends of LBH" Group including Bob and Mr. Utley on this story? Thanks. I hope to attend the Annual Meeting this year if it is NOT too late to register.

Keith: What makes studying this battle so fascinating is one can imagine any possible outcome. Hope to see you at the battlefield. Regards, B.R.


Name: Colin Cooper
Date: 29 May 2008
 

Comments

I ran across your web site while reading Donovan's book  A Terrible Glory: Custer and the Little Bighorn - the Last Great Battle of the American West. My great grandfather was a preacher from North Dakota. When I was a child he described the battle to me from accounts given to him from actual Indian participants. He ministered to American Indians his entire life finishing at Klamath Agency in Oregon.

Hi Colin - Donovanís book has quickly turned into a rarity: a history book that sells. Itís good to hear your reading it has led you to learn more about this interesting subject. Thanks for dropping by to visit. Regards, B.R.


Name: Thomas Wood
Date: 29 May 2008
 

Comments

Greetings icame across your site today and havee been reading for hours. I have had a connection to the greasy grass since visiting the battlefield as a child.

Thanks for visiting, Thomas. Regards, B.R.


Name: Bobby Davis
Date: 29 May 2008
 

Comments

Hi Chuck Read: Are you related to Ira Read The Moccasins i have in my possesion i bought from your Family.They were from the Gottshell Collection but Ira Read took very special care of these Moccasins and someone added a newsole senew sewm just before Gottshell purchased them.Bobby Davis davisrl@tds.net


Name: Bobby Davis
Date: 29 May 2008
 

Comments

Hi: If you have the picture of Crazy Horse would you might be intrested in his vision Moccasins.Of the hail storm just curios i wanted to donate them to the Crazy Horse Musem.But they have been slow about talking to me so get in touch.davisrl@tds.net and i will send you some photos then we can talk.Thanks

5/29/08 Bobby: We're not affiliated with the Custer Museum (which is privately owned at Garryowen, MT). We really can't help you with your request. Regards, BR


Name: Mark Houston
Date: 27 May 2008
 

Comments

Hi, I'm also a decendant of Charles Kaminski. If anyone finds additional information on him, please email me at nelray40@yahoo.com. Thanks!


Name: Kristin Kaminski
Date: 23 May 2008
 

Comments

Hi. I'm descended from Charles Kaminski who is listed as a Sergeant at the Battle of Rosebud. My cousin read a book about the battle and it included his name, but we don't know the name of the book. Do any of you know of a book about the battle that gives a lot of names?? i'd really appreciate any leads.

5/23/08 Kristin: I checked all of my books that focus on the Rosebud Battle and do not find Kaminski listed in any of the indexes. Iím not aware of a book that just list the names of soldiers in that battle. If anyone does, I invite them to post it this guestbook. We do have Kaminski listed on our website. Youíll find Kaminski listed in Company M, 3rd Cavalry of the Wyoming Column on our website. Regards, B.R.


Name: Thomas Sšnger
Date: 22 May 2008
 

Comments

Hallo. Sehr schŲne Seite. Ich hoffe das ich irgendwann mal diesen geschichtlichen Platz besuchen kann. Nice greeting from Germany

5/22/08 Thomas: Thank you for those kind words about our website. I, too, hope you can someday stand upon Last Stand Hill and breathe history. If you do, please tell us about your experience. Regards, Bob Reece


Name: Danalee Lavelle
Date: 19 May 2008
 

Comments

Thank you for the Brian Pohanka tribute. I've been catching Civil War Journal reruns on The History Channel and was really impressed with him. I just googled him (5/19/08) and found, to my dismay, that he passed away. As I read more about the man himself, I discovered his love for your organization and preserving history at Little Bighorn. Another reason to like Pohanka. We've really lost a treasure with the passing of Pohanka. My thoughts and prayers, albeit somewhat tardy, to his wife, Cricket and family.


Name: Joel Grossman
Date: 11 May 2008
 

Comments

According to my mother Capt. Yates was my great uncle. His sister, Jane Ann Yates died giving birth to my great grandmother Sara Jane. Does anyone have any additional info on Capt. Yates life and family before his military career? Thanks Joel Grossman Minden Nv

5/11/08 Joel: I did forward your request to an individual who might be able to help. Regards, B.R.


Name: janice weiss truitt
Date: 07 May 2008
 

Comments

just wanted to say thank you again for the photo of t'shunka witko...i have told just about everyone i know where to find it...amazing to have it after all these years of wishing..we havent been there since 1999/2000...miss being able to come..we are down here in fort worth texas..you are always in our thoughts


Name: CHUCK REID
Date: 06 May 2008
 

Comments

WE HAVE SEARCHED OVER OUR FAMILY TREE BACK TO THE LATE 1600'S DISCOVERED THAT I HAD TWO RELATIVES, 3 IF YOU COUNT CUSTER HIMSELF. BOSTON AND CUSTER'S NEPHEW, AUTHUR(HARRY ARMSTRONG"AUTIE") REID. HE WAS A MEAT PACKER AND CUSTER FAVORITE NEPHEW. THEY ARE BOTH BURIED IN A CEMETARY IN INDIANA.


Name: Donna Gagliano
Date: 03 May 2008
 

Comments

Sorry, I hit the reset button. I wasn't finished with my comment. I will try again tomorrow. Thanks


Name: Donna Gagliano
Date: 03 May 2008
 

Comments

Hello Friends, There is a John S. Ragsdale on the muster roll that I believe is my g-grandfathers older brother. I found his enlistment record. John S. Ragsdale enlisted 23 July 1872, Co. A, 7th Cavalry. I found a posting on the message boards about a year ago regarding a newspaper article: Press Gazette, Hillsboro, Ohio, June 3, 1941 : Survivor of Custer's 'Last Stand' in Resident Here. John S Rugsdale, one of the four survivors of Custer's Massacre, who lives in Hillsboro, is 91 years old and spry as most men at 40. Never before has John made a statement or talked about the famous last stand of General Geo. Custer. "I always kept it to myself, as most people wouldn't believe suchthings ever happened", John said"all they would have to do is check on any statements I might have made in Washington and they would soon learn I spoke the truth." The article states that he stood six feet two inches tall, weighs 158 pounds. At the time of the Battle he weighed about 180. The problem I am having is that on the enlistment record, he is 5' 7" tall. His brother Isham C. Ragsdale enlisted 3 months after his brother and is listed as 6' 1".


Name: Carolyn Bennett
Date: 24 Apr 2008
 

Comments

Bob: I could hardly bridle the emotion I felt when I checked the website this morning to read your perceptive interview with Michael Donahue, along with such a genuine review of his book, Drawing Battle Lines. I have watched Michael remain true to his original 'map book' objective through the last twenty+ years of near-global searching and RE-searching, a medley of thrilling discoveries and disappointing dead-ends, and the requisite challenges of negotiation and humble compromise. I know that I join many who wish to sincerely congratulate him on this significant accomplishment and to fully encourage his further contribution to Little Bighorn Battle history study and literature, as he industriously begets his next volume. With continued passion for the subject at hand, CWB

4/24/08 Thank for writing, Carolyn. One of the main reasons the interview with Mike was well-done is because of his articulate and forthright character as well as his passion for this subject. Iíve known Mike from the very first summer he started at LBH.  Iím very lucky for that. And, students of the Battle of the Little Bighorn are fortunate that Mike is tenacious in his pursuit of maps and drawings of this battle. Lastly, thank you for allowing us to publish, on the interview page, the great photo you shot of Mike painting Custer's Last Stand. Iíve already heard from one Friends member who loves that photo. Regards, Bob


Name: Judy Davis
Date: 23 Apr 2008
 

Comments

I forgot to add - "Happy Birthday" on 4/28


Name: Judy Davis
Date: 23 Apr 2008
 

Comments

Bob - you do a great job!


Name: Matt
Date: 16 Apr 2008
 

Comments

We were at the Battlefield many years ago and would like to return. I have a question. We have recently been traveling and I thought I saw an advertisement about a special event going on at the Battlefield this spring or summer. Do you know anything about that? Thanks. You have a great site.

4/24/08 Thanks for writing Matt. Friends had several events taking place. Jump here to read more. Regards, Bob


Name: Gay Jones
Date: 10 Apr 2008
 

Comments

The mist photos are just gorgeous!!! Wow

4/10/2008 I love those photos as well Gay. Thanks for taking the time to comment. Regards, B.R. Update 4/24/08 Marvin sent us more  photos -- this time of a late snowfall in spring. Check them out on the same page as the mist photos.


Name: John Lombard
Date: 10 Apr 2008
 

Comments

Very Informative Site...Being an admirer of Lt. Col. Custer since childhood, I now honor his memory having served in The United States Army, and remember all those who have fought and died for our country.

4/10/2008 Thanks for your service John and thank you for visiting our site. Regards, Bob Reece


Name: Ebony Bourdain
Date: 08 Apr 2008
 

Comments

Great site. Wonderful work. Always helpful.


Name: kayla
Date: 07 Apr 2008
 

Comments

Hi, I was wondering if you knew any place to look for desendents of custer.


Name: rocky hanrahan  mass
Date: 28 Mar 2008

Comments

The old tv show the twilight zone put out a real erie tale of the battel of the littel of the big horn. I am watching it right now on the tv station sci/fi at 1:13 edt. interested? i'll try to get a copy. I'ts great!!


Name: Matthias Dunlop
Date: 26 Mar 2008

Comments

I need to say how much I appreciate Mr Marshall's words in the book, Walking with Grandfather. My girlfriend bought me his book for my birthday. I love her and I really enjoyed the book!


Name: Suzanne M. Cork
Date: 23 Mar 2008

Comments

Just wanted to say hello to the organization and introduce myself. I am the new Park Ranger for the Rosebud Battlefield. I also wanted to extend a helping hand if ever needed.

3/24/2008 Suzanne: Thanks for the note Suzanne and the offer of a helping hand. Hopefully, we'll have an opportunity to work together for both battlefields. Regards, Bob Reece


Name: Bob Gerling
Date: 14 Mar 2008

Comments

I have about a dozen images taken at the 50th in 1926 by John Dwight Neal from Iowa. Each includes his comments, notes on the reverse i.e. the fact that he had to pay .50 to get a Native pose. My favorites are those of the "movie" people taking motion pictures for a documentary. Does this moving film exist and can you help me find where it can be viewed? Thank you. Bob Gerling

3/14/08 Bob: Iím not aware of any films from the 50th anniversary events at LBH but if there are, Iíd sure like to see them. Iíll check some of my sources to see if they know of any. If you don't mind, please send me an email at info@friendslittlebighorn.com Regards, Bob Reece

3/19/08 Bob: I spoke with Dick Upton and he is not aware of any movies although he was well aware of the movie camera. Maybe someday they'll turn up. Thanks, Bob


Name: Ron
Date: 12 Mar 2008

Comments

Hi Bob, I certainly do remember "the good old days" and also how sad it was to lose Brian Pohanka. The last time we were at LBH was on the day of his funeral in Virginia. Unfortunately, we are getting too old to make the 24 hour trip from Perth, so we keep looking at the cameras and remembering.............. best wishes Ron

3/13/08 Thanks for the call-back, Ron. I've asked the battlefield staff to look into the camera problem. Hopefully, they should be moving around again. I can use the webcams as a weather forecaster for where I live in Colorado. In almost all cases, we have the same weather in 24 hours. If I see fresh snow on Last Stand Hill, then I know I'll wake up to it the next day. I hardly have to watch the weather forecast during my local TV news program anymore. I'm sorry that won't work the same for you in Perth, but at least you know what the visitors are experiencing at LBH. Take care, Bob

3/19/08 Ron: Ken Woody contacted me today. As I thought, he has been out of town and has returned to the office. He's got the webcams rotating now. Check them out. Thanks, Bob


Name: massimo buttinelli
Date: 08 Mar 2008

Comments

The greasy grass is a wonderful place for me!I hope i'll come there soon...Hotamitaneo.


Name: Ron
Date: 06 Mar 2008

Comments

Hi Bob, I look at the Webcams frequently from here in Australia, however they appear to have been stuck in the same position for many months now. Is there any reason for this? All the best Ron

3/6/2008 Alamo Day: Hey Ron, great to hear from you. I haven't seen you for about 10 years. Last time was when we were with Richard Fox and Brian Pohanka overlooking the Little Bighorn Valley behind the staff housing. Remember that? I think Sandy Barnard and/or James Brust were with us as well. I'm glad you can get to visit LBH anytime from down under thanks to the webcams. Sometimes they get stuck, so I'll give the battlefield a call tomorrow and see if they can give the cams a little push to get them moving again. I see they received a dusting of snow earlier today. Take care, Bob


Name: Ellen Rouse
Date: 02 Mar 2008

Comments

I visited the Little Bighorn Battlefield in 1963, when I was 12 years old. It remains among one of the most moving experiences of my life, along with seeing Ground Zero in NYC following the terrorist attacks of 9/11/01. The anguish of knowing the suffering of the Indian people and the gratefulness of being an American remain conflicting emotions for me and many others, I'm sure. I hope to return and see the Indian Memorial that is so long overdue.

3/6/2008 Ellen: I think you'd be very impressed with the Indian Memorial and the changes that have taken place at the battlefield. The memorial has enhanced interpretation and the visitor experience. Regards, B.R.


Name: Crazy horse photo?
Date: 29 Feb 2008

Comments

There were no photos taken of Crazy horse because he feared that his spirit would be captured and taken away from him.


Name: mick chase
Date: 28 Feb 2008

Comments

What a great website. I had the pleasure of visiting the battlefield 4 years ago and it is a trip that i will gladly make all over again. this has always fascinated me and i thoroughly enjoy this site. one question though. i have read in books about crazy horse that he never allowed his picture to be taken but have come across some pictures in books alleging to be hi,. do you know of any truth to this story? just curious. keep up the good work!


Name: Lia H.
Date: 24 Feb 2008

Comments

thank you for this web site i visited the little bighorn battlefield in the late 1990's i remember a picture in the visitors center that was a spirit of a indian in the shy looking down over the land is the picture still there how do i find it on the web. 3/6/2008 Lia: I think the painting you're remembering might have been one by Don Griffins. It had spirits of Custer and Sitting Bull along with a few other principals from the battle looking down over the battlefield. But, I can't remember what it was called. Thanks, B.R.


Name: JEFF WILLIAMS, WALES, UK
Date: 22 Feb 2008

Comments

Apart from enjoying your site I have recently viewed a fascinating TV documentary about the implications of the recent archeological discoveries. What book would you recommend which embraces not only the background to and history of the military engagement, but also takes into consideration these recent findings. As i understand it, there may not have been a last stand!

2/22/2008 Jeff: Glad to hear you're enjoying our site. We've been building it since 1999 and it keeps growing. Please, jump here to our archeology section for a short list of the best books on the archeological digs at LBH. My personal favorite is Scott's, the first listed, because it includes all the final reports from the various studies conducted during the digs. It's the best book to start reading on this subject. When you think you've understood it well, then I recommend Fox's book next. It's Fox's theory that contends there was not a last stand where Custer fell. Fox also believes the final moments of the fight occurred in the Deep Ravine. All of these books are outstanding. Regards, B.R.
P.S. Scott believes the last stand did take place where Custer fell.


Name: KATHLENE
Date: 19 Feb 2008

Comments

Mr Reese, Would you have any idea where I could find a copy of the "Little Bighorn Battlefield Map-Archeological Finds and Historical Locations"? It is by an author named Bonafede and I was told that Upton Books carried it. For some reason, I can't seem to contact them by internet! Can you advise me? Thank you so much. I love your website, and you are to be commended for its content!

2/19/2008 Kathlene: I know the map you speak of. You can purchase it through Upton and Sons for $10.00. Call them toll free at 800-959-1876. Jump to their website. Richard Upton will definitely help you find that map.

Thank you for your kind comments regarding the Friends website and its content. Remember, you can always visit our Site Map to quickly find what is new or recently updated. Its navigation button is at the bottom of every page. Also, always remember to refresh and scroll the entire Site Map so you don't risk the chance of missing something new. Regards, Bob Reece


Name: Roger Tertocha
Date: 11 Feb 2008

Comments

I just read the interview with Ernie Lapointe and found it fascinating. My hat is off to both of you for doing this and letting us see how history continues to be made. 2/19/2008 Roger: I'm glad you enjoyed the interview with Ernie. We're trying our best to keep our members and visitors up to date with news from the battlefield. Regards, B.R.


Name: Lora
Date: 08 Feb 2008

Comments

Very nice site! Just wanted to let you know, that there is a Little Bighorn soldier buried in Monroe, LA where I work as a Genealogy Librarian. He was John H. Day, Company H. Unfortunately, he was lynched for arson in 1894. His wife is buried in one of our cemeteries and now that we know about him, we have plans to order a headstone for him. It will be placed by the side of his wife since his burial site is long gone. I'm currently digging up anything I can find on him! It has been an interesting journey. Thanks again for all the info you have here! 2/19/2008 Lora:  You're welcome. We'll keep our readers informed on the placement of the headstone. Lora plans on sending us photos which I'll place in our soldier burial section. Regards, B.R.


Name: Alan Edward Yates
Date: 08 Feb 2008

Comments

please can you put me in contact with e yates as i am reserching my family tree and george yates was my gt gt gt grandfather my own father who died years ago said in a letter to me we lost a ancester at the little big horn as my father went back to the states when i was young i know nothing onthe yates side thank you


Name: Landra M. Lowe - Pake
Date: 03 Feb 2008

Comments

I was happy to know of my family tie to to him my great granfather and medichineman and chief WAS SITTING BULL. THANK YOU FOR ANY OTHER INFO. ON HIS WARES MY HOPE IS TO SOMEDAY LET MY KIDS SEE WHERE HE WAS KILLED AND FIND OTHER FAMILY &WHAT HERBS WERE TRULY FOUND IN HIS POUCH LOVE TO KNOW MORE OF THE MAN.


Name: joe lapointe
Date: 29 Jan 2008

Comments

i know they were indians but they were leaders and i think it should show the names of the leaders that were killed and were they were killed


Name: betty c l
Date: 16 Jan 2008

Comments

Thank you for the website it is very interesting. We plan a visit this year and need all the information we can obtain.


Name: Kathy Barefoot
Date: 14 Jan 2008

Comments

I enjoyed this article. I recently discovered that Sgt. Daniel Kanipe was my mother's grandfather's brother (her maiden name is Kanipe). What a surprise to find out I had a relative who fought with Custer. I have been reading a lot on the internet about him. I will be visiting the battlefield in July 2008 and I cannot wait to actually stand on that ground.


Name: Kenton Kozak Jan 2008
Date: 03 Jan 2008
 

Comments

As a trucker hauling fuel from Calgary AB into Montana I became interested in the history . The web site was very interesting to check out . I've always been a fan of the times . I will at some point visit the monuments and sites . So thank you for the information. You're very welcome. Drive careful out there. Regards, B.R.


Name: DEBBY S. F.
Date: 03 Jan 2008
 

Comments

Being born & raised in Hardin, Montana, & now living in Ohio, it was great just to see all the positive changes & improvements of the battlefield. My dad, Dennis Sanders had quite a few pictures of his in the museum at one time. We visited the Battlefield in Feb.07, & it brought back a lot of memories of when I was a kid. However, I didn't remember ever being charged a fee to drive back on the roads. But all in all a great, & historical landmark. Keep up the good work.

1/6/08 Hi Debby: Thanks for being the first to post in our guestbook for 2008. It's great you came home as well as visit the battlefield. The entry fees have been in existence for around 10 years (I don't remember exactly when they started). Other NPS sites have been charging fees a lot longer than LBH, however, the fees help ensure a stable infrastructure and enhance the visitor's experience. Here's hoping you have a great new year and can return to LBH sometime soon. Regards, Bob Reece

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